fangirlspodcast:

turtletotem:

I have long said that in order for any comedy to truly succeed as a story, there has to be meat beneath the jokes. There has to be that moment when it is not funny any more.

This. This is that moment.

I know that people often make fun of the “The Book Was Better” crowd, but PLEASE read the book. The story behind Inigo and his father and how he ended up dying is so fucking incredible in the book, and it adds an entirely new layer. 

Just. Read it.

devastationnation:

devastationnation:

you know its cold when….

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Terminator 2's T-1000, a liquid metal robot capable of changing its shape at will, just became a little less far-fetched. Researchers at NC State have reported a new method for controlling the form of a liquid gallium alloy. Surface tension governs the shape a liquid assumes when it is not confined by a container, and, although adding surfactants can slightly lower the surface tension, it does not substantially alter the liquid’s shape. Adding soap to water lets one make bubbles, but surface tension keeps the bubbles spherical no matter how much soap you add. Instead, these researchers control the surface tension of the liquid metal using a mild voltage. Applying a voltage creates (or removes) an oxide layer on the liquid metal’s surface, thereby altering the surface tension. By controlling the formation of the oxide layer, the researchers can change the surface tension from approximately 7x that of water to nearly zero. The video above demonstrates some of the liquid shape control this lets them achieve.  (VIdeo credit: M. Dickey et al.; research: M. Khan et al.; via PopSci)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Terminator 2's T-1000, a liquid metal robot capable of changing its shape at will, just became a little less far-fetched. Researchers at NC State have reported a new method for controlling the form of a liquid gallium alloy. Surface tension governs the shape a liquid assumes when it is not confined by a container, and, although adding surfactants can slightly lower the surface tension, it does not substantially alter the liquid’s shape. Adding soap to water lets one make bubbles, but surface tension keeps the bubbles spherical no matter how much soap you add. Instead, these researchers control the surface tension of the liquid metal using a mild voltage. Applying a voltage creates (or removes) an oxide layer on the liquid metal’s surface, thereby altering the surface tension. By controlling the formation of the oxide layer, the researchers can change the surface tension from approximately 7x that of water to nearly zero. The video above demonstrates some of the liquid shape control this lets them achieve.  (VIdeo credit: M. Dickey et al.; research: M. Khan et al.; via PopSci)

bigblueboo:

the center holds

scienceisbeauty:

Light Printing

We are exploring new modalities of creative photography through robotics and long-exposure photography. Using a robotic arm, a light source is carried through precise movements in front of a camera. Photographic compositions are recorded as images of volumetric light. Robotic light “painting” can also be inverted: the camera is moved via the arm to create an image “painted” with environmental light. Finally, adding real-time sensor input to the moving arm and programming it to explore the physical space around objects can reveal immaterial fields like radio waves, magnetic fields, and heat flows.

Via Mediated Matter (MIT)

theenthusiast7:

Space Bedding

Please add me on Facebook Thomas Marsh-Connors

thingsorganizedneatly:

cavetocanvas:

Damien Hirst, The Tears of Jesus, 2003-2005

editor’s note: A lot of you may not know this, but I have another blog called LOOSETIGER. For the record—Austin Radcliffe’s other blog, loose tiger. It’s pretty good too.

thingsorganizedneatly:

nprfreshair:

By Emily Blincoe

Happy Labor Day! A long-time favorite of Things Organized Neatly, Emily Blincoe, featured on NPR’s Fresh Air blog (one of my favorite NPR shows) spotted by Charles, my partner in my other other blog, Fadient.

sinobug:

Praying Mantis Nymph (Hierodula patellifera, Mantinae, Mantidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Beijing, China

See more Chinese praying mantids on my Flickr site HERE…..

sciencesourceimages:

How Mandelbrot’s Fractals Changed The World

by Jack Challoner/BBC News

During the 1980s, people became familiar with fractals through those weird, colorful patterns made by computers. But few realize how the idea of fractals has revolutionized our understanding of the world, and how many fractal-based systems we depend upon.

Unfortunately, there is no definition of fractals that is both simple and accurate. Like so many things in modern science and mathematics, discussions of “fractal geometry” can quickly go over the heads of the non-mathematically-minded. This is a real shame, because there is profound beauty and power in the idea of fractals.

See more Mandelbrot Fractal images

The best way to get a feeling for what fractals are is to consider some examples. Clouds, mountains, coastlines, cauliflowers and ferns are all natural fractals. These shapes have something in common - something intuitive, accessible and aesthetic.

They are all complicated and irregular: the sort of shape that mathematicians used to shy away from in favor of regular ones, like spheres, which they could tame with equations.

Mandelbrot famously wrote: “Clouds are not spheres, mountains are not cones, coastlines are not circles, and bark is not smooth, nor does lightning travel in a straight line.”

The chaos and irregularity of the world - Mandelbrot referred to it as “roughness” - is something to be celebrated. It would be a shame if clouds really were spheres, and mountains cones.

Look closely at a fractal, and you will find that the complexity is still present at a smaller scale. A small cloud is strikingly similar to the whole thing. A pine tree is composed of branches that are composed of branches - which in turn are composed of branches.

Read the entire article

Fractal images © Laguna Design / Science Source

Mandelbrodt photo © Emilio Segrè / Science Source

gifak-net:

Glass Fracturing At 5 Million Frames Per Second

myampgoesto11:

Photographic soap bubble studies by Santiago Betancur Z  that look like planets  

Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces

Watch this beautiful collaboration between Santiago Betancur Z and musician Julian De La Chica

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

proofmathisbeautiful:

Chinese Artist Exhibits Gorgeous ‘Sculptures’ Built By Bees

 | By
The Beijing-based artist and beekeeper Ren Ri is a focused man. His new three-part series — titled “Yuansu” in reference to the Chinese word for “element” — turns bees into his collaborators. Yuansu II features sculptures made by bees, of beeswax.

In an interview with CoolHunting, Ren explains the “special” properties that make beeswax such an interesting material:

“It’s unstable and can change shape with temperature. The structure of wax cells is orthohexagonal, which is an inconceivable feature in the natural world and it’s a peculiarity of honeybees.”

The sculptures are housed in transparent plastic polyhedrons. At the center of each is the queen bee, positioned thusly so as to enable the worker bees to build around her. They build symmetrically, due to the even planes of the polyhedrons. Every seventh day, Ren changes the gravity of the structure by rotating the box onto a different side. The act is in reference to the biblical concept of creation, but introduces a random element. Ren determines how to shift the box by the roll of a dice. Each time, there’s no telling how the bees will react to their new environment.